Claude Stanley of Freedom Sidecars wrote this and I am repeating here for my reference.

Just posted this on another site and thought I would share it

here………. Origional question: Toe in ..

How much toe in do you guys recommended?

I’ve also read to measure from right behind the rear wheel to right in front of front wheel. Is this correct?

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Could wriite a book here LOL…………….Anyhow, toe in should be kept to a minimum with lean out and/or tilt being thought of as a means to provide good tracking. Tracking will vary with road camber , weight in sidecar etc. This is why a tilt adjustor or an antiswaybar are good features to have in many cases. ……………………..However as far as toe in goes it is very important to use just the rear wheel and the sidecar wheel to set your straightedges up to. DO NOT use the fronnt wheel! Why? Tire sizes vary on many bikes so what you think is ,say , 1/2″ toe on may be in reality 2″ or more. Another method is to mark a straight line on the floor and center both front and rear tires on it. That works well but it is a good idea to make sure both wheels are in line properly. Beleive it or not this is not always to case. As a sidenote if you have a chain drive bike check the rear wheel for being straight as those little marks on the swingarm are not always gospel.

We use heavy wall aluminum angle for a straightedge but anything that is straight will work. Flourescent light tubes are a good choice and many times can be had for nothing. Good idea to wrap then with tape in a barber pole fashion in case of breakage. Straight 2×4’s are kinda rare but if ya put a screw in each end on the side and stretch a string between them ya got it made.

Place straight edges up against the rear and sidecar tires as high up off the floor as possible. This avoids any sidewall buldge. It is a good idea to jack up each wheel first and check for runout. If you wish to have consistane numbers every time place the valve stems down so your measurements will always be an apples to apples comparison. Measure just in front of the front wheel and just behind the rear wheel of the bike. We shoot for 1/2″ to 3/4″ MAX!! More toe in IS NOT the way to improve tracking and will only increase tire wear. Too much toe in is hard to detect except for the tire wear but toe out will cause a pull toward the sidecar. ………………………………………………. As a sidenote if you have a rear pivot swingarm make sure the pivot bearings are nice and tight otherwise the thing can possibly drift from toe in to toe out and can end you up in the wacky ward tring to get consistant handling and tracking.. Front pivot swingarms should be checked also bit they will produce kind of a castering effect if loose with not nearly as much inconsistancy in tracking noticed. …………………………. Bottom line go for minimal toe in. 1/2″ to 3/4″ max. We are looking for a reference figure period! Different bikes have longer or shorter wheel bases as overall track widths vary so noo matter when we write or read it is rarely a true apples to apples comparison. ………………………..Once set monitor tire wear. It is ususlly the rear tire that wears the fastest. If you have a car tire or a large tire on the rear compared to a skinny tire on the sidecar you may find the sidecar tire grinds away quicker. Note that too much wheel lead also comes into play as far as tire wear goes as does trail but the number one thing is too much toe in. …………………………….IMPORTANT : Adjusting lean out can change toe in and visa versa on many rigs. Check your own rig by unhooking the upper struts and loosening the lower connections slightly. Have a helper watch the sidecar wheel closely as you lean the bike in and out. Once you know what your rig does keep it in mind. If you decide to change th elean out later on it is good to know what it may do to toe in. If you are leaning the bike out to curtail a pull toward the sidecar and in doing so your rig goes into toe out unknowingly it can create a huge ‘head scrating momennt’ as one adjustment affects the other.

Exceptions to the above to a certain degree are true HP rigs running very wide car tires all around but that is another topic.

Hope this helps….have fun.